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  • Posted On:
    August 31, 2018
    Yesterday I was photographing along Lake of The Woods in the extreme Northwestern corner of Ontario. It was the third time in 10 days, finishing up working on a new book for next spring about The Lake of The Woods area, a collaboration with writer and 'book lady' Elisabeth Campbell of 'Elisabeth Campbell Books' in Kenora, ON for Vidacom Publications (Les Editions des Plaines). I was up at the crack of dawn and looking at different angles before proceeding to capture the dawn light as it appeared across the main beach in Sioux Narrows Provincial Park. Just before sunrise (and again just after sunset), the 'Belt of Venus' glows bright pink above the horizon. This 'pink glow' atmospheric phenomenon, also known as an 'anti-twilight arch', extends some 10-20 degrees above the horizon and is caused by a back scattering of reddish light from the rising or setting sun. Minutes earlier, a dark blue band of the 'earth's shadow' was visible below the pink band.


    I am always fairly cautious when walking along shorelines as rocks are often wet and slippery. I had photographed at this exact location just a few weeks earlier and I was quite aware of how slippery these rocks were. Nevertheless, and without warning, one of my feet slipped on the wet rock. Before I knew it, I had tumbled head over heels, landing on my back in a shallow pool of water among the rocks. As I was falling, many thoughts rushed through my head! Miraculously, I did not hit my head on a rock! I also managed to keep my camera and lens from crashing on the rocks. Today, I am a bit sore on my backside but things could have been much worse!


    I did 'get the shot' (shown above), albeit fully drenched! I headed for the van, stripped down and changed into dry clothes. Considering that it was dawn, I did not get overly chilled. One always has to be mindful of potential hazards! Chalk it up to just another story in the 'life of a nature photographer' !


    Want to hear more stories, find out why the image works and all about how to publish photographs? Come and join me, Kristian Bogner (Canmore, AB), Chris Collacott (Vancouver, BC and Tula Edmunds (Calgary, AB) at 'The Business of Fine Art Photography Symposium' in Calgary, Alberta this coming September 24-27, 2018. We love to share our stories and images!
    Posted In:This And That
  • Posted On:
    February 9, 2017
    The 10th Anniversary (Winter 2017) issue of Outdoor Photography Canada Magazine is now at the newsstands. Congratulations to editor Roy Ramsay and the staff at OPC! Ten years ago, I began writing and illustrating a feature called 'Discovering Canada' in each issue of the magazine. With this 40th issue, I explore the northwestern region of Ontario, the Lake of the Woods area in and around Kenora that borders the eastern side of Manitoba. Each issue of the magazine features interesting and topical articles by some of Canada's finest nature and outdoor photographers ... and the images aren't too shabby either! In every issue, editor Roy Ramsay runs a profile with an interview and portfolio of images from either an aspiring or seasoned photographer. And there is much, much more too! I invite you to have a look and join us!
    Posted In:This And That
  • Posted On:
    October 1, 2013
    The area that stretches from Kenora south to Morson in Northwest Ontario is sparsely populated and not a popular destination for travelers as they mostly confine themselves to the TransCanada Highway from Winnipeg to Thunder Bay. This area is however very scenic as cottage owners know only too well. While Rushing River Provincial Park is clearly the most popular destination in the area, the landscape in and around beautiful Lake of The Woods is second to none in terms of beauty. From fog blanketed lakes at sunrise to blazing red maples in autumn, there is plenty to explore here. You are sure to hear the haunting cry of the loon and, if you are truly lucky, you may just witness a timber wolf cross Dryberry Creek as I did last weekend while photographing red maple trees reflecting in the creek.

    Click on the main image to see more images from this area.