IN FOCUS

 
  • Posted On:
    May 19, 2016
    A couple of weeks ago I was pleasantly surprised to see for the first time in my yard, a pileated woodpecker. A couple of days ago, as I was sitting on the front porch admiring spring coming into its own, I heard the unmistakable sound of a pileated woodpecker. This time, I had enough time to quietly sneak into the house and grab my 'wildlife' camera and capture a couple of images of the once threatened species as it foraged for insects in my tall Manitoba maple tree. Unfortunately, this does not bode well for my tree!

    Posted In:In The Backyard
  • Posted On:
    November 15, 2015
    In the park beside my backyard, I composed this image of tree shadows as the sun rose above the horizon.
    Posted In:In The Backyard
  • Posted On:
    December 9, 2014
    #treesinfourseasons

    This is my fourth and last image in the #treesinfourseasons challenge. Summer is a busy time for most of us. At this time of the year, the foliage of many trees is a kind of dull green color which tends to blend into the background. As humans, we generally look at trees as a whole and seldom look at the individual parts that make up the tree. One of these often overlooked parts is the bark which varies considerably from tree to tree and often times also within a particular tree species. Bark offers an important layer of protection for the tree. Seen from up close, bark can offer a myriad of photo opportunities. Beautiful detail is revealed simply by getting closer and paying more attention to what is around you. Summer is a good time to slow down. Shown here are two images of bark from the Sycamore tree, a deciduous species that can be found in southern Ontario.

    I challenge John Marriott - friend, colleague and regular contributor to Outdoor Photography Magazine - to the #treesinfourseasons challenge.

    Your challenge images must represent all four seasons, one from each season. With each entry please challenge one other person and use the hashtag #treesinfourseasons so everyone can search to find all the entries as the challenge progresses.
  • Posted On:
    December 8, 2014
    #treesinfourseasons

    This is my third image in the #treesinfourseasons challenge. Autumn is 'a many splendoured season'. It is bright and joyous at peak colour. Normally, we focus our attention on deciduous trees as they turn color in the fall when the pigments within the leaves change with the shorter days and early frost before the onset of winter. On my recent trip to photograph fall colors in Ontario, I noticed these beautiful larches backlit in my friend's (Peter Blahut) aunt's yard. Larches, also known as tamaracks, are deciduous conifers, meaning that they lose their needles (leaves) in the fall, unlike other evergreen trees. The needles of the larches turn yellowish - orange and, when backlit, seem to glow more brilliantly!

    I challenge Kelly Funk - my friend, colleague and regular contributor to Outdoor Photography Canada magazine - to the #treesinfourseasons challenge.

    Your challenge images must represent all four seasons, one from each season. With each entry please challenge one other person and use the hashtag #treesinfourseasons so everyone can search to find all the entries as the challenge progresses.

  • Posted On:
    December 7, 2014
    #treesinfourseasons

    This is my second image in the #treesinfourseasons challenge. Spring, that season of renewal, is so welcomed in this part of the country where winters can be so long, depending on the particular year. As the first spring ephemerals make their way through the ground, so do the young leaves of trees and other plants. Each species of deciduous plants has its own 'built-in' clock of when the leaves appear and later drop in the fall. As the new leaves emerge and begin to grow, they change tremendously from that bright yellowish to lime green color before turning into a deeper and duller green as the leaves reach their full size in a few weeks. Photographing the early leaf flush in the spring is one my favorite things to do, as these sugar maple trees exemplify so beautifully.

    I challenge my friend and colleague Andrew MacLachlan to the #treesinfourseasons challenge.

    Your challenge images must represent all four seasons, one from each season. With each entry please challenge one other person and use the hashtag #treesinfourseasons so everyone can search to find all the entries as the challenge progresses.

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