IN FOCUS

 
  • Posted On:
    December 8, 2014
    #treesinfourseasons

    This is my third image in the #treesinfourseasons challenge. Autumn is 'a many splendoured season'. It is bright and joyous at peak colour. Normally, we focus our attention on deciduous trees as they turn color in the fall when the pigments within the leaves change with the shorter days and early frost before the onset of winter. On my recent trip to photograph fall colors in Ontario, I noticed these beautiful larches backlit in my friend's (Peter Blahut) aunt's yard. Larches, also known as tamaracks, are deciduous conifers, meaning that they lose their needles (leaves) in the fall, unlike other evergreen trees. The needles of the larches turn yellowish - orange and, when backlit, seem to glow more brilliantly!

    I challenge Kelly Funk - my friend, colleague and regular contributor to Outdoor Photography Canada magazine - to the #treesinfourseasons challenge.

    Your challenge images must represent all four seasons, one from each season. With each entry please challenge one other person and use the hashtag #treesinfourseasons so everyone can search to find all the entries as the challenge progresses.

  • Posted On:
    December 7, 2014
    #treesinfourseasons

    This is my second image in the #treesinfourseasons challenge. Spring, that season of renewal, is so welcomed in this part of the country where winters can be so long, depending on the particular year. As the first spring ephemerals make their way through the ground, so do the young leaves of trees and other plants. Each species of deciduous plants has its own 'built-in' clock of when the leaves appear and later drop in the fall. As the new leaves emerge and begin to grow, they change tremendously from that bright yellowish to lime green color before turning into a deeper and duller green as the leaves reach their full size in a few weeks. Photographing the early leaf flush in the spring is one my favorite things to do, as these sugar maple trees exemplify so beautifully.

    I challenge my friend and colleague Andrew MacLachlan to the #treesinfourseasons challenge.

    Your challenge images must represent all four seasons, one from each season. With each entry please challenge one other person and use the hashtag #treesinfourseasons so everyone can search to find all the entries as the challenge progresses.

  • Posted On:
    December 7, 2014
    You've heard the expression 'f8 and be there'. Yesterday it was more like 'f16 and I was there' ! The point is that images are made when presented with an opportunity but opportunities don't happen unless you make them happen. The weather forecast for yesterday was for a mainly cloudy day but I decided to venture out in the morning anyway because I wanted to see if I could spot some snowy owls as discussed in the previous post. Looking at the sky, I could detect a small clearing in the clouds so I knew the sun would likely shine though at some point soon. Not seeing any snowy owls at the moment, I drove around trying to find nice subject matter to photograph when the sun did come out. I settled on this grouping of hoarfrost covered trees. The sun shone for only a few minutes but, in the process, I was able to frame the trees with a beautiful formation of clouds that lasted only too briefly before melding into an amorphous mass of white color.
  • Posted On:
    December 5, 2014
    #treesinfourseasons

    This is my first image in the treesinfourseasons challenge. I have been challenged by my friend Joe Kerr to submit 4 images of trees, one in each of the four seasons.

    At least once a year - and sometimes two or three times - the landscape around Winnipeg gets covered with a magical coating of hoarfrost. Often, I will head up north on Hwy 15 from the TransCanada and look for this Manitoba Maple tree. It's just a prairie maple at the edge of the road but it often looks spectacular when covered in frost. In this particular image, I added a slight texture of denim which imparted a bit of a surreal look.

    I challenge Peter Blahut to the #treesinfourseasons challenge.

    Your challenge images must represent all four seasons, one from each season. With each entry please challenge one other person and use the hashtag #treesinfourseasons so everyone can search to find all the entries as the challenge progresses.
  • Posted On:
    March 13, 2014
    Rain creates interesting possibilities if you can get out of your comfort zone. I was travelling in northern Manitoba late last summer and came across this scene west of The Pas, not far from the Saskatchewan border. It had rained much of the day but I kept exploring anyway. This series of shelterbelt trees at the edge of a canola field that had just bloomed caught my eye. The air was laden with moisture, creating a monochromatic scene of white sky with little color but the soft greens of the trees and canola field. The light rain was refreshing although I did have to keep wiping the lens free of rain drops from time to time. I previsualized three seperate, consecutive photographs to create a wide, panorama. This image will print well either as a panorama or as a triptych of the three images mounted in a matted frame.

    Contrary to popular belief, I have always been attracted to 'subtle images'. In fact, in the early 80's, I had an exhibition in Edmonton, Alberta called 'Subtle Images'. This image would have fit well in the series.
page 1 of 4PreviousNext