IN FOCUS

 
  • Posted On:
    March 14, 2017
    I am pleased and very excited to announce that I will be editing a new book about Canadian Nature Photography for Rocky Mountain Books. This beautiful art book will be published in the fall of 2018 and will showcase a wide variety of some of the best nature photography made by Canada's visual artists specializing in photography. Besides an essay on nature photography by yours truly, the book will also feature a foreword by Freeman Patterson, arguably Canada's finest photographic artist. The submission process is now open and we are seeking submissions from photographers who have created a large body of excellent nature imagery. The publisher will be donating a portion of the proceeds from the sale of the book to a Canadian environmental organization to be determined in the near future.


    As some of you know, I have been involved in promoting Canadian photography for years, going back to my humble beginnings in the early 80s. During the ensuing decades, I lectured and presented on various aspects of nature photography to various camera clubs and organizations, including the National Association for Photographic Art (NAPA). NAPA eventually merged with the Colour Photographic Association of Canada (CPAC) in 1996 to form the Canadian Association for Photographic Art (CAPA). The last 20 of my 40 years in photography have been spent pursuing a full-time career as a freelance photographer, specializing in nature photography.


    It has been nearly two decades since Canadian nature photographers have been collectively featured in book form. The first major celebration that I can remember came in 1967 during Canada's centennial year when Lorraine Monk, celebrated Executive Producer of the Still Photography Division at the National Film Board, edited 'Canada – A Year of the Land'. This monumental work featured some of Canada's finest photographers of the day. In 1980, well-known Canadian photographer, J.A. Kraulis, edited a book called ‘The Art of Canadian Nature Photography’ and, in 1982, edited a second book called 'Canada: A Landscape Portrait'. In that same year, Lorraine Monk edited 'Canada With Love', a special tribute celebrating Canada's 115th birthday and the patriation of the Constitution of Canada. In 1990, Canada's photographic icon, Freeman Patterson, edited 'The Last Wilderness - Images of the Canadian Wild', a remarkable portrait of our wild places. Finally, Lorraine Monk returned in 1999 to edit 'Canada: These Things We Hold Dear – A Millennium Celebration' Honouring Canada’s Photographers'. It is our hope to continue this fine tradition by producing a new book featuring fine nature photography from Canada's exceptional photographers currently practicing today. I look forward to reviewing the submissions and eventually adding this book alongside the above mentioned titles to my personal collection of art books.


    Anyone interested in being considered for possible inclusion in the book should consult the information provided on the Rocky Mountain Books website under 'Call to Nature Photographers'.


    The submission process is now open and the deadline for receipt of submissions is December 15, 2017.


    Posted In:This And That
  • Posted On:
    September 26, 2016
    2016 was a busy summer, photographically speaking. It started with me traveling to Grasslands National Park in extreme southern Saskatchewan, first waiting out some rainy weather and then having fun experimenting with my new B&W infrared camera. Then I crossed the USA border to attend the 2016 'Outdoor Writers Association of America's Annual Conference' in Billings, Montana from July 16-18. At the request of Friesens Corporation, I sat on a panel about book publishing alongside Don Gorman (Publisher at Rocky Mountain Books), Riley Blott (Sales Manager at Friesens Press) and David Frank (Western Sporting). Doug Symington (Friesens Corporation) moderated a well-attended session that dealt with evaluating different options offered through traditional publishing, self-publishing and specialty publishing. I met some great folks and had lots of fun chatting about books.


    After the conference I headed west to gather some news images of British Columbia for upcoming projects. I focused mostly on locations that I had not seen yet or had spent little time in so far. Locations included The Paint Pots in Kootenay National Park, the endangered antelope-brush ecosystem in Osoyoos, Manning Provincial Park, the hoodoos in Fairmont, the dry areas around Kamloops, Cache Creek and the Fraser Canyon, island hopping on Salt Spring, Mayne and Saturna islands (part of the Gulf Islands), Port Renfrew, the Sea to Sky Highway, totem poles carved by First Nations people in the villages of Kispiox, Kitwanga and Kitwancool (some of which have been painted by Emily Carr) and finally headed to Haida Gwaii (formerly the Queen Charlotte Islands) to explore this remote area. I had an opportunity to visit friends and family and, as usual, there was not enough time to see everyone or discover all the wonderful places that are still left undiscovered.

    The above image was created near Cache Creek in the British Columbia Interior as sunlight broke through the stormy sky just before sunset. I will post new images soon.
    Posted In:This And That