IN FOCUS

 
  • Posted On:
    March 31, 2015
    Printing a book can take a while, depending on the physical size of the book, how many pages in the book, how many books are being printed, whether there are any special processes required, etc. Assuming everything runs well, I plan to be 'on press' for about 37 consecutive hours or so. I hope to get in an hour or so of sleep between some of these press checks.

    While in Altona, I shall be well taken care by Friesens . They provide their clients with very comfortable spaces to relax, sleep and eat. I always take time to check out the new books they printed since my last visits. Looking forward to this.
  • Posted On:
    March 31, 2015
    Once the prepress work was completed (two full days), it was time to prepare some proofs for a final edit. The CONTENT PROOFS are essentially a mock up of the entire book to confirm the layout and check the entire text for any typos, potential issues with fonts, etc. It also allows us to check that all captions are in the proper locations, etc. The RUSH PROOFS allow us to inspect the photographs for color, contrast, sharpness, etc. If we did a good job on prepress, there shouldn't me much to correct here. In addition to assessing a sampling of the photographs, we also look over the cover with a fine tooth comb. Everything is set, the metal plates are now being etched in time for my trip back to Friesens tomorrow morning to start press checking the book as it comes off the press.
    Posted In:This And That
  • Posted On:
    March 21, 2015
    I spent this past Monday and Tuesday at Friesens in Altona, Manitoba doing the prepress work for my upcoming book 'Ontario'. It was a hard two days of sitting at the computer ensuring that all the images in the book will translate in print as closely as possible to my vision. While I processed all the images on my calibrated system in my office, we made a number of conversions necessary for printing on the offset press. This included converting from the RGB to CMYK color space, adding a printer profile as well as a paper profile, sizing the images, tweaking the color and contrast after the conversions (if required), checking for any 'dust spots' that might have been missed earlier and applying any sharpening (if required). 'Prepress wizzard' Ray Friesens was in full control, implementing any changes I thought might be required. Pictured above is Ray in front of the main monitor displaying the current image we were working on, with the monitor to the right showing the page spread layout in InDesign and a matching color proof on the left. This is the sixth book that Ray and I have worked on and I have to give Ray much credit for making these books as good as they are. Doing due diligence on prepress makes the printing of any book a much easier and enjoyable task. Today I spent the better part of the day proofing all the text once again in anticipation of color proofs to come in a few days. Next Wednesday and Thursday (and possibly Friday), I return to Friesens to press check the book as it comes off the presses!
    Posted In:This And That
  • Posted On:
    November 10, 2014
    Along with water, trees have been a major focal point throughout my career, first while working in forestry for some 18 years and then as a nature photographer for the other half of my working career.

    Trees, however, offer much more than practical benefits. They also have a way to make us feel good! Trees have inspired countless artists in their art and are fascinating subjects in themselves. Whether they are depicted as individual objects or as part of a forest scene, they offer the viewer limitless variations on the themes of line, shape, form, texture and color. There is a tree for all seasons!

    Trees, however, offer much more than practical benefits. Trees have inspired countless artists in their art and are fascinating subjects in themselves. Trees have a way to make us feel good! Whether they are depicted as individual objects or as part of a forest scene, they offer the viewer limitless variations on the themes of line, shape, form, texture and color. There is a tree for all seasons!

    Text from 'A Singular View' - Fine Art Photographs by Mike Grandmaison (2012)

    Design by Jef Burnard

    Printed by Friesens in Altona, Manitoba

    This 'stately' cottonwood is a recent discovery, about 10 minutes from my home. While it is a great specimen, it is not always accessible as the narrow 'dirt road' leading to it is more or less made from 'Winnipeg gumbo' and becomes extremely slippery when wet, even for an all-wheel-drive vehicle. In the middle of winter, the road is not plowed and therefore it is also impassable until the ground dries up in late spring. I made this image yesterday morning just as the first rays of the rising sun began to illuminate the 'plains cottonwood' tree and its wonderful branch structure as the moon was setting in the western sky. I made three, overlapping images (up and down the tree) to create a panorama with the 'shifting' movement of my 20mm PC lens (perspective control). I then decided to crop the image to a square format because it just 'felt good'.

  • Posted On:
    November 9, 2014
    'La Cathédrale de Saint-Boniface' and 'Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes' are the first two books to be published in a new book series called 'Lieux et paysages du Manitoba' (loosely translated, it means 'Places and Landscapes of Manitoba'). Over the course of the next few years, many new titles will be added, including 'Le Manitoba' (Manitoba), 'Churchill et les ours polaires' (Churchill and polar bears) and 'Saint-Léon' in the coming year. This series is published by Les Editions des Plaines and Vidacom of Winnipeg, designed by Tetro Design and printed by Friesens in Altona making this a truly 'Manitoba Made' Project. The books are available in both French and English editions.

    It is exciting to be collaborating with renowned architect Etienne Gaboury and 'Plaines' president Joanne Therrien in 'La Cathédrale de Saint-Boniface'. The book features fascinating historical facts, archival photos and recent photographs from your truly. 'Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes' is the first of a series of books to honour the many 'French speaking villages in the Province of Manitoba.

    Posted In:This And That
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