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  • Posted On:
    April 15, 2016
    Some of my images of Leo Mol's exquisite sculptures were recently published in a Russian Art Magazine called Золотая палитра. If you are like me, you may not speak much Russian so I asked the author, Maria Lakman, to translate the title of the magazine; it is 'Golden Palette Art Magazine'.


    There is a short series of events leading to my involvement with the above article which I would like to mention. Maria first introduced herself in December of 2012 following a telephone conversation I had with one of the daughters of the famous painter Nicholas de Grandmaison. After years of trying to connect, finally I was able to chat about this painter of 'indian portraits' who also carried the same name as me. I mentioned to his daughter that Nicholas has written a letter in 1954 to one of my relatives asking him whether he was related to our family. The letter was printed in a book called 'Sur les traces de nos ancetres - Jean-Baptiste Grand'Maison , ses descendants et le Drame acadien' (2003) by Dr. Reginald Grand'Maison. It is essentially a book about my Grandmaison family from the time my first Canadian descendant (Guy-Jean-Baptiste Guillot) landed in the Province of Quebec (likely in Ste-Anne-de-Beaupre) from France in the period between 1700-1712. Maria Lakman contacted me and asked whether she could read the letter as she was currently involved in writing a book in Russian about Nicholas de Grandmaison. I eventually received a copy of the book (2013) but, unfortunately, I can only 'look at the pictures'!


    Maria contacted me again in 2014 and asked if she could meet me at the Leo Mol Sculpture Garden in Winnipeg as she was now writing an article about the sculptor. I had a very pleasant walkabout through the gardens with Maria and her husband and later I submitted a selection of images of the sculptures that I had created over the years. The above images were those selected for the article, along with other photos from other sources. Incidentally, if anyone is interested in reading a translation of the article, you can do so by clicking here. Should you like a challenge and wish to read the article in Russian, please contact me and I will forward you a pdf of the article. Interesting how one event can lead to another!


    Posted In:This And That
  • Posted On:
    April 15, 2016
    I first saw this iceberg the day before and photographed it from the shoreline near Eastport, Newfoundland in the afternoon as well as later that same evening and then again the following morning at dawn. On my return to a local B&B for breakfast, my traveling companion and I made one more stop to have a look at this amazing iceberg. Living on the prairies, I don't see these every day! As I was composing the first image, I suddenly heard a very loud CRACK and I told my buddy "Get ready, it's coming down"! A few seconds later, the iceberg began to tilt to the left and proceeded to crumble during the span of less than three minute as I captured this sequence of images of an event that I was indeed privileged to witness. Only days earlier, I had been much too close to other large icebergs floating in the Atlantic Ocean. Because most of the mass of an iceberg is actually under the water and not visible, a tidal wave could easily cause you to overturn and drown should your boat be too close. Life is always full of unexpected events!
  • Posted On:
    April 15, 2016
    Spring has been a lingering affair this year with a greater than usual repetition of melting and freezing events. A few weeks ago, I meandered into the Seine River Forest and made a few images of ice that formed on pools and puddles at the edge of the trees as well as images of the melting ice on the Seine River itself. The late afternoon sun created a lovely contrast between warm and cool colors. Click on the main image to see the other images in the gallery.
  • Posted On:
    April 6, 2016
    The Spring / Summer (2016) issue of Outdoor Photography Canada Magazine (OPC) is now on Canada's newsstands. Through entertaining, interesting and informative articles and imagery, the Contributing Photographers of OPC Magazine share their love and passion for photography and the outdoors. In each issue, subscThe Spring / Summer (2016) issue of Outdoor Photography Canada Magazine (OPC) is now on Canada's newsstands. Through entertaining, interesting and informative articles and imagery, the Contributing Photographers of OPC Magazine share their love and passion for photography and the outdoors. In each issue, subscribers get a glimpse of what's involved for myself and each and everyone of my colleagues in pursuing our passions. Kudos to editor Roy Ramsay for his vision, hard work and perseverance in making this happen.


    For almost 10 years now, I have been writing and illustrating about my travels and adventures across this great country we call Canada. Next year, on July 1, 2017, Canada will celebrate it's 150th Anniversary. This latest issue of OPC features my 37th article since the magazine launched back in 2007; how time flies! In my latest installment of 'Discovering Canada', I explore 'The Dempster Highway' which crosses through parts of the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. I know some of you will be heading up that way this summer so I hope you enjoy. Happy Travels!ribers get a glimpse of what's involved for myself and each and everyone of my colleagues in pursuing our passions. Kudos to editor Roy Ramsay for his vision, hard work and perseverance in making this happen.


    For almost 10 years now, I have been writing and illustrating about my travels and adventures across this great country we call Canada. Next year, on July 1, 2017, Canada will celebrate it's 150th Anniversary. This latest issue of OPC features my 37th article since the magazine launched back in 2007; how time flies! In my latest installment of 'Discovering Canada', I explore 'The Dempster Highway' which crosses through parts of the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. I know some of you will be heading up that way this summer so I hope you enjoy and Happy Travels!
    Posted In:This And That
  • Posted On:
    April 3, 2016
    Feeling Grateful!

    There is much to feel grateful about as I celebrate 20 years as a full-time professional freelance photographer. In and of itself, 20 years in a career is not overly special but it becomes a little more significant when you consider that it follows an earlier 20-year career in the biological sciences. It was no ‘April Fool’s joke either as I launched the new career on April 1rst, 1996, essentially starting from scratch. Needing an outlet for creativity, this new adventure as an entrepreneur demanded much effort along the way but it also proved to be extremely exciting and rewarding. What began as an innocent hobby soon became a serious hobby, then a passion (if not an obsession at times) and eventually turned into a profession. After 40 years behind the camera, I now consider photography a lifestyle that will likely continue until I pass on into the next world!

    This occasion offers a splendid if not timely opportunity for reflection. I feel that I have been blessed in so many ways. From a happy and nurturing childhood I then raised a wonderful family which is still growing! My relatively good health has allowed me to travel and explore the width and breath of this great country we call Canada. In the process I have engaged in many fascinating experiences, witnessed some amazing vistas as well as observed many personal, intimate views of the natural world which I seem to be drawn to.

    I learned fairly early in the new career to focus on things that I liked and respected, to photograph what I loved and avoid the things I really did not enjoy. I learned to command a fair price for my services and not give away my work for a ‘song and dance’, for the promise of a credit line or, worst of all, for free. This is not to say that I didn’t contribute to charitable organizations because I did but this was done prudently and for causes I truly believed in. To be successful, a profession must be sustainable.

    While I am my ‘own boss’ and I have the freedom to work for whom I choose, I also realized that, in order for this profession to be rewarding, it was imperative to treat my clients with respect and dignity. Generally, I work with clients who respect me, who appreciate the work I do and who are willing to pay a fair price in exchange. I refused to work for many clients who did not meet the above criteria. In the process, I created what I believe to be a significant body of work about this great country which will soon celebrate its 150th anniversary. I feel privileged to have authored a number of books to date and to have my photography featured in countless venues in Canada, the U.S.A. and around the world. In the last few years, I have focused more of my energies into producing books and making fine prints. In my humble opinion, those venues offer me an opportunity to present my work in the best light as well as afford a longevity to the work. This 20th anniversary further coincides with the launch five years ago of ‘The Canadian Gallery’, my online venue for displaying my artwork. Indeed there is much to be grateful for.

    I also learned a great deal from others while pursuing this passion of mine. We don’t generally acknowledge the people that have made a difference in our lives until it is too late. I have been blessed learning from some exceptional teachers. I also feel grateful for the opportunity to have worked with many wonderful designers, publishers, printers and representatives who have allowed my creativity and vision to come forth. I am also grateful to have collaborated with some exceptional clients on fascinating and engaging assignments. I have met many interesting people along the way either at seminars, presentations, workshops or simply ‘in passing’. I made new friends in the process and have had the chance to reconnect with many others. My colleagues, friends and family provided me with much support over the years, sometimes via a warm meal, welcomed accommodations, a tasty cup of coffee, sound advice or simply through their friendship. I would also be remiss not to acknowledge the influence of many of my colleagues across the country as well as my colleagues closer to home, in particular those from my photo critique group which has met almost once a month for more than 35 years. We do not live in a vacuum! And what about the other artists who inspired me early on and who significantly influenced the way I see and do things, like Freeman Patterson, Brett Weston, Robert Bateman, The Group of Seven and Emily Carr to name just a few. I am forever grateful to all of you.

    While I feel that much has been accomplished, I also feel that I have so much more to contribute. It’s as if I am just getting started. As the industry and profession of photography forge through challenging times, I look forward to continuing my explorations and creating imagery that I hope will inspire.

    Thank you all and looking forward to the next 20 years!
    Posted In:Contemplations
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