IN FOCUS

 
  • Posted On:
    December 5, 2014
    #treesinfourseasons

    This is my first image in the treesinfourseasons challenge. I have been challenged by my friend Joe Kerr to submit 4 images of trees, one in each of the four seasons.

    At least once a year - and sometimes two or three times - the landscape around Winnipeg gets covered with a magical coating of hoarfrost. Often, I will head up north on Hwy 15 from the TransCanada and look for this Manitoba Maple tree. It's just a prairie maple at the edge of the road but it often looks spectacular when covered in frost. In this particular image, I added a slight texture of denim which imparted a bit of a surreal look.

    I challenge Peter Blahut to the #treesinfourseasons challenge.

    Your challenge images must represent all four seasons, one from each season. With each entry please challenge one other person and use the hashtag #treesinfourseasons so everyone can search to find all the entries as the challenge progresses.
  • Posted On:
    November 10, 2014
    What a difference a day can make! I made this image of drifting snow on pavement with my iPhone coming back from babysitting the grandkids this evening.
  • Posted On:
    November 10, 2014
    Along with water, trees have been a major focal point throughout my career, first while working in forestry for some 18 years and then as a nature photographer for the other half of my working career.

    Trees, however, offer much more than practical benefits. They also have a way to make us feel good! Trees have inspired countless artists in their art and are fascinating subjects in themselves. Whether they are depicted as individual objects or as part of a forest scene, they offer the viewer limitless variations on the themes of line, shape, form, texture and color. There is a tree for all seasons!

    Trees, however, offer much more than practical benefits. Trees have inspired countless artists in their art and are fascinating subjects in themselves. Trees have a way to make us feel good! Whether they are depicted as individual objects or as part of a forest scene, they offer the viewer limitless variations on the themes of line, shape, form, texture and color. There is a tree for all seasons!

    Text from 'A Singular View' - Fine Art Photographs by Mike Grandmaison (2012)

    Design by Jef Burnard

    Printed by Friesens in Altona, Manitoba

    This 'stately' cottonwood is a recent discovery, about 10 minutes from my home. While it is a great specimen, it is not always accessible as the narrow 'dirt road' leading to it is more or less made from 'Winnipeg gumbo' and becomes extremely slippery when wet, even for an all-wheel-drive vehicle. In the middle of winter, the road is not plowed and therefore it is also impassable until the ground dries up in late spring. I made this image yesterday morning just as the first rays of the rising sun began to illuminate the 'plains cottonwood' tree and its wonderful branch structure as the moon was setting in the western sky. I made three, overlapping images (up and down the tree) to create a panorama with the 'shifting' movement of my 20mm PC lens (perspective control). I then decided to crop the image to a square format because it just 'felt good'.

  • Posted On:
    October 26, 2014
    I just processed this image of an intimate view of Lower Rosseau Falls in Muskoka which I made just before the sun set below the horizon. Cloud prevailed most of the day but the sun peaked through a short time before sunset. The light became too strong for photographing the waterfalls but, as I was walking up the side of the river I noticed the glow of the nearby maples reflecting prime autumn color onto the flowing waters. We kept creating past sunset. Thanks again to Andrew McLachlan and his brother Gregg for this opportunity.

    I will be including this image in my presentation called 'Meditations' that I will be delivering in Regina, Saskatchewan as part of the 'Frame By Frame' Photo Seminar from November 1 to 2. Other speakers on the agenda include Freeman Patterson, Dennis Fast and others.
  • Posted On:
    October 26, 2014
    My recent trip to Ontario with colleague Peter Blahut was challenging weather wise as we experienced plenty of cloud, rain and wind! When the wind calmed down, we found opportunities to create intimate views of waterfalls as this one at The Fish Hatchery near Rosseau. The lack of contrast kept the detail in the highlights from blowing out and the dark shadows from blocking up. As is often the case, it's a question of finding an interesting angle and waiting ... waiting for the wind to ease enough to make the required long exposure. Thank you to Andrew McLachlan and his brother Gregg for the new discovery.
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