IN FOCUS

 
  • Posted On:
    April 15, 2016
    I first saw this iceberg the day before and photographed it from the shoreline near Eastport, Newfoundland in the afternoon as well as later that same evening and then again the following morning at dawn. On my return to a local B&B for breakfast, my traveling companion and I made one more stop to have a look at this amazing iceberg. Living on the prairies, I don't see these every day! As I was composing the first image, I suddenly heard a very loud CRACK and I told my buddy "Get ready, it's coming down"! A few seconds later, the iceberg began to tilt to the left and proceeded to crumble during the span of less than three minute as I captured this sequence of images of an event that I was indeed privileged to witness. Only days earlier, I had been much too close to other large icebergs floating in the Atlantic Ocean. Because most of the mass of an iceberg is actually under the water and not visible, a tidal wave could easily cause you to overturn and drown should your boat be too close. Life is always full of unexpected events!
  • Posted On:
    April 15, 2016
    Spring has been a lingering affair this year with a greater than usual repetition of melting and freezing events. A few weeks ago, I meandered into the Seine River Forest and made a few images of ice that formed on pools and puddles at the edge of the trees as well as images of the melting ice on the Seine River itself. The late afternoon sun created a lovely contrast between warm and cool colors. Click on the main image to see the other images in the gallery.
  • Posted On:
    November 17, 2015
    Some people call them caves but most are really just huge cracks in the limestone bedrock. This large crack was found alongside Lake Winnipeg near Pine Dock, MB and was covered with moss. It towered 4-5 meters and was at least 20 meters deep. It is similar to the cracks and fissures found along Clearwater Lake in Clearwater Lake Provincial Park. It is part of a larger system that I plan to explore next summer.
  • Posted On:
    November 4, 2015
    F8 and be there! It pays to be ready. Most importantly though, you have to be there! You need to make the effort. I left Winnipeg with my friend Dave Benson on a wet and soggy early morning around 4:30 AM and arrived in Kenora just before sunrise. It rained for most of the two-hour drive. It looked as if the sky would clear just in time for sunrise at Middle Lake and, in fact it did, but it only lasted a few minutes, just enough to create a few images. Had I listened only to the current weather forecast or not made the trip out to Kenora, the top image would have remained unexposed. The sky remained fairly cloudy for the rest of the day but I did return later at sunset to capture the bottom image. I used neutral graduated filters to better balance the extreme contrast of light. F8 and be there!
  • Posted On:
    November 1, 2015
    My traveling companion, Brad Smith, and I came across this large iceberg shortly past Eastport on our way to the seaport of Salvage. We managed to find a location off the main road to make a few images and then proceeded to Salvage to photograph the scenic little village. On our way back to our B&B, we passed the iceberg once more and decided to make a few more images off the main road, including the image you are viewing. It was a very peaceful and serene scene and we left with the hope of trying to photograph it again the following morning. The next morning we photographed it again just before returning for breakfast when all of a sudden we heard a loud crack as I yelled "It's coming down"! In a matter of less than a minute, the iceberg literally crumbled into pieces before our eyes as we, of course, continued to photograph. I managed a nice sequence of images which I hope to show in the future. It sure brought home the point that you should never approach too close to an iceberg, thinking of course of the week prior when we had indeed done just that! What an experience!!!
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