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Celestial Beauty in the Canadian Rocky Mountains
Mike Grandmaison, October 27, 2017 at 6:43 AM

Some optical weather phenomena are caused by airborne ice crystals that act like tiny prisms and diffract or bend the light slightly as the light passes through the ice crystals. Sundogs, also known as parhelia or mock suns, can be seen on opposite sides of the 22 degree sun halo just below where the mountain tops meet the sun halo. At the top of the 22 degree sun halo is a faint tangent arc. Also emanating from the sun is a very faint sun pillar (column of light) rising vertically towards the tangent arc but mostly obscured by the ice fog that is prevalent in much of the image. Even with temperatures hovering between -30 and -40 degrees Celsius, much beauty can be photographed in nature if you are comfortable and warmly dressed. Athabasca Glacier on The Icefields Parkway. The Canadian Rocky Mountains, Jasper National Park, Alberta, #canada150 #RockyMountains #CanadianRockies #CanadianRockyMountains #Jasper #JasperNationaPark #Alberta # IcefieldsParkway #sky #halo #sunhalo # parhelia #majesticRockies #mountains #winter #22degreehalo #weather #parhelia #sundogs #tangentarc #sunpillar