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VisionMongers - Making A Life And Living In Photography
Mike Grandmaison, November 22, 2010 at 5:41 PM

"VisionMongers - Making A Life And Living In Photography"

by David duChemin

 

 

If you have any intention of pursuing a career in photography, this book by Canadian photographer David duChemin is a must "read"! Even if you don't, you should read it. This is by far the finest resource about the business of photography that I have ever come across.

 

Last August,  I taught a photo course entitled "Making A Living At Nature

"VisionMongers - Making A Life And Living In Photography"

by David duChemin

 

 

If you have any intention of pursuing a career in photography, this book by Canadian photographer David duChemin is a must "read"! Even if you don't, you should read it. This is by far the finest resource about the business of photography that I have ever come across.

 

Last August,  I taught a photo course entitled "Making A Living At Nature Photography" at the Niagara School of Imaging. As I was planning the course, a friend dropped off a copy of this book for me to have a look at. I glanced at it and promptly forgot about until a week or so before my course ran. I opened the book and began to read and simply could not put it down! Interestingly enough, I had once pitched a similar idea to my publisher. After reading David's book however, I knew there was no reason for me to attempt to write another book on the topic.  

 

Having been in the business of photography full time for the last 15 years, I agree with much of what David states about the business. He begins by discussing the importance of having a passion for image making as well as developing your own vision. As you read through the book, he draws a path for reaching the goal of becoming a freelance photographer, emphasizing that it will require much hard work along the way. He discusses the full gamut of topics; stock and assignment photography, finding clients, marketing, pricing your work, finances, the cost of doing business, contracts, diversification, sponsorships, and so on. Perhaps the only point of contention for me is the idea of sponsorships - personally, I think too many folks go the sponsorship route instead of making it on their own. A few well matched sponsors can be beneficial but too many folks go way overboard. David also shares the experiences of a variety of other photographers along the way, providing yet another point of view.

 

This is a well written book and I highly recommend it to anyone thinking of pursuing this highly competitive field. I would go even further and state that this book should be recommended reading in every photo school !